Category Archives: 未分類

That’s what I experienced as a foreigner in Japan

Here at Mickey House Cafe, people of all walks of life gather all year long. Everyone contributes to the cafe in their own way.

Let me introduce you to Jacinta, one of our foreign visitors. She agreed to share her time and experience in Japan and her feeling at the near end of her stay.

Jacinta: J
Pierrick: P

P : So today I’m with Jacinta, hello !

J : Hello !

P : Jacinta who comes from Australia ; so tell me, since how long have you been coming at the cafe ?

J : I have been attending at Mcey House cafe for one month now.

P : One month ?

J : Yeah, one month.

P : Then can you tell us how you did find the cafe before coming to Japan ?

J : Eventually it was a friend of mine Jessica, she’s another Australian, she came a couple of months ago with her fds and recommended it to me, saying that it has… A really good vibe to it, and a good place to get friendly with foreigners and the locals to get together and… to just hang out and chat. And that picked my interest, especially since I have difficulties to get close to the locals and I thought it twas a great way to set my foot into it.

P : And after everything, what do you think about the cafe ?

J : It was beyond what I expected honestly…

P : Oh yeah ?

J : Yeah. I was thinking about coming quite blind and didn’t do much of researches before coming to Japan, I just took for account my friends words and, after being here for a month, everyone and everything going on here is consistently being friendly, being a lot of fun and it has been very unique. Everyone I’ve met were happy when they left, and I think this is something very important as consistency, not just one person having a eat time, basically everyone having a great time is important as well.

P : So you met some good people here ? Made some friends along the way ?

J : Yeah, whether staff members or customers, really kind people and… Go above to make you feel like part of a family…

P : A family, really ?

J : Yeah !

P : So… then, in the first place, may I ask you why did you came to Japan ?

J : I always had an interest for japanese culture and, I’ve already been to Japan four times already and I’ve always felt really safe in that country… I love all the food, the customs, the sightseeings and… the main thing that has always attracted me here is the kind of opportunities that you can only have here, by that I mean types of cafe, restaurants, activities, themed parks and everything like that, I feel like it is something you won’t see anywhere else. And that’s why I keep coming back here.

P : I can see that. Also I know that you are an author so, maybe you find some good inspiration here ?

J : Oh I have spent too much time doing anything else and enjoying myself rather than sitting down thinking about other realities… That being said I admit that I will take away all the experiences that I had here, and… maybe be able to use it in my future works yeah. Maybe something set in a japanese theme or japanese people but I don’t really know yet.  

P : Okay. So, during this trip, did you saw interesting things ? What did you visit ?

J : Oh yeah, I always try to do something different every time I come here, and especially during that trip I mean, I went a month prior and with my friend Jessica We travelled around Japan, going to amusement parks, climbing mountains in the snow and then I… Also went to Osaka and Kyoto which was… I mean I’ve done this before so there isn’t anything new but, with my friend we went to this virtual reality thing and…

P : Oh you went there ?

J : Yeah ! It was an activity in Shinjuku, it was surprisingly fun, something I think I’ve never seen before and I’ve been loving it. I recommend it to anybody coming here… Then in island near the Mount Fuji, that was fantastic !

P : Well then, maybe we will go there !

J : Yeah, do so !

P : I also know that you will not be leaving Japan just now, you will be receiving your family and friends, so are you planning to visit something in particular or will you just go around… ?

J : BAsically, everything I’ve been doing so far I’m redoing it, most of the people – I’ve got a couple of friends and my mother with a friend of her – so they’ve never really been in Japan before, and my boyfriend is coming too, he has been coming with me already and we have done all the tourist stuff… So they are leaving everything up to me, whatever I found really interesting during this trip I will be doing all over again with them so that is exactly what is going to happen. We will be doing all the Mario Kart thing, the robot cafe, the cat cafe, the snake cafe, the owl cafe, the fishing restaurant… The maid cafe, staying at a capsule hotel… doing everything and everything, going to Mount Fuji…

P : Okay…

J : And I will be having done it three times already !

P : At least you liked it !

J : Yeah, I got to really like it !

P : Then maybe a last question, do you have some advices for english speaking people who would like to come to Japan ?

J : Some advises… Basically before to come here you have to understand all the customs and rules here… Just some social minor behaviors like do not talk on your phone in the train, take off your shoes when you are entering someone’s house, little things that you may already know of… That will really be helpful to understand things when you come… otherwise it is very foreign friendly here, you will find – especially if you are an english speaking – everywhere translated signs, it has been all adapted to help tourists, so there’s really nothing much to worry about… ? Just come over and relax, and then enjoy yourself… they may be some things that they won’t tell you because of some… Social decency they have, but just understand them and know about what to do and not to do. Otherwise you will be fine.

P : I see. Well, this is the end for today. Thank you JAcinta, hope to see you again at the cafe !

J : Yes, thank you !

 

Le Japon sans parler le Japonais ? Petit guide de survie.

«Le Japon est un de ces pays dans lequel il vaut parler la langue locale plutôt que l’anglais pour se faire comprendre.»

Ayant fait l’expérience sur place et ayant rencontré nombre de personnes qui partagent cette même expérience, il ne serait pas farfelu de dire que cette phrase reflète vraiment la réalité.

Il y aura toujours l’une ou l’autre personne que vous croiserez qui parlera l’anglais, mais il faut savoir que, en règle générale, la langue de Shakespeare est la bête noire de beaucoup de japonais.

Mais, d’un autre côté, si vous n’êtes pas japanophone, il est vrai que s’y retrouver dans la multitude de panneaux d’indication écrits en japonais n’est pas sans rappeler les travaux d’Hercule.

Le Mickey House Cafe est conscient de la situation et vous propose donc cette fois-ci un abrégé de guide de survie ou quelles sont les phrases clefs en japonais qu’il serait utile de connaître pour apprécier davantage son séjour.

N’oubliez pas que les « r » sont légèrement roulés, les « u » à la fin des mots ne se prononcent pas et que les « e » se prononcent « è ». Aussi, toutes les lettres se prononcent: les diphtongues n’existent pas en japonais.

Généralités :

Avant toutes choses, voici quelques phrases et expressions de la vie courante, pour ne pas être démuni lors d’une rencontre.

Bonjour (matin): Ohayo gozaimasu / Ohayo (おはようございます/おはよう)

Bonjour (journée) : Konnichiwa (こんにち)

Bonsoir : Konbanwa (こんばん)

Au revoir : Sayōnara (さような)

Tchao : Mata ne (また)

Oui/non : Hai/iie (い/いい)

S’il vous plaît : Onegaishimasu (おねがいしま)

Merci : Arigatou gozaimasu / Arigatou (ありがとうございます/ありがとう)

Excusez-moi : Sumimasen (すみません)

Enchanté : Hajimemashite (はじめまし)

Je m’appelle… : Watashi wa … desu (わたしは)

Je suis français : Watashi wa furansujin desu (わたしはフランスじん)

Dans les lieux publics (magasins, restaurants…)

Lorsque vous irez dans des lieux publiques tels que des boutiques, vous entendrez revenir certaines formules souvent. En effet les établissements japonais ont certaines règles qui sont identiques pour tous. Voici ce que vous pourrez entendre et avoir besoin de dire.

Bienvenue ! Irasshaimase ! (いらっしゃいませ)

Par ici, entrez ! Kochira dozo ! (こちら どうぞ)

  •         Dans les magasins :

Combien cela coûte-t-il ? Kore wa ikura desu ka ? (これはいくらです)

Cher : Takai ()

Bon marché : Yasui ()

Où puis-je trouver un ATM ? ATM wa doko desu ka ? (ATM はどこです)

Non-merci : Kekkou desu (けっこうで)

Voulez-vous un sac plastique ? binīru-bukuro ha go riyou desu ka? (ビニール袋はご利用です)

Puis-je payer avec ma carte bancaire ? Kaado de haraemasuka ? (カードで払えます)

  •         Dans les restaurants/izakaya/bars/etc…

Je voudrais 1,2,3… de cela : Kochira itotsu, futatsu, mitsu… Onegaishimasu (こち1,2,3… おねがいしま)

C’est très bon : Totemo oishii desu (とてもおいしい )

L’addition svp : O kaikei kudasai (お会計ください)

Puis-je avoir un verre d’eau svp ? O mizu wo onegaishimasu (水をおねがいしま)

Bon appétit : itadakimasu (いただきま)

Merci pour ce repas : goshisousamadeshita (ごちそうさまでし)

Avez-vous un menu anglais svp ? (のメニューはあります)

Demander son chemin :

Si vous devez demander le chemin à un passant, celui-ci souvent ne pourra parler anglais. Il vaudra dès lors mieux prévoir ces petites phrases utiles:

Excuser-moi, pouvez-vous m’indiquer le chemin s’il vous plaît ? Sumimasen, michi wo tazunetai no desuga. (すみません、道を訊ねたいのですが。)

Est-ce que vous parlez anglais ? Eigo ha hanasemasuka? (英語は話せますか)

Où se trouve … ? … wa doko desu ka ? (…はどこです)

Droite : Migi ()

Gauche : Hidari ()

Tout droit : Massugu (真っ直ぐ)

Par ici : kochira desu (こちらで)

Je veux aller à … : Watashi wa … Ikitai (行きたいに行きたいですが)

Gare : Eki (駅)

Hotel : Hoteru (ホテル)

Train : Densha ()

Bus : Basu ()

Taxi : Takushii (タクシ)

Voiture : Kuruma ()

Vélo : Jitensha (自転車)

Avec ces quelques mots et expressions, vous pouvez dorénavant partir l’esprit léger. N’oubliez pas que la plupart des panneaux dans les gares sont traduits en anglais ou au moins transcrits en alphabet.

En cas de problème n’hésitez surtout pas à demander de l’aide à un passant ou à un policier, contrôleur, etc. Tous vous aiderons sans aucun doute le plus spontanément du monde, même s’ils ne parlent pas anglais.

Nous espérons que ces petites phrases utiles vous sauverons la mise lors de votre prochain séjour!

Interview time! Being a foreigner in Japan.

Here at Mickey House Cafe, people from all over the world and all walks of life come together all around the year. Each and every one of our clients and visitors share their unique experience and always color up the atmosphere in the cafe. They all make that special “je ne sais quoi” about Mickey House.

Here is an interview we did with Jacinta, a Mickey House visitor. She shared with us her experience staying in Japan and her how she feels as she is getting near the end of her stay in Tokyo.

(Below: Jacinta (J) – interviewee, Pierrick (P) – interviewer)

P : So today I’m with Jacinta, hello !

J : Hello !

P : Jacinta who comes from Australia ; so tell me, since how long have you been coming at the cafe ?

J : I have been going to Mickey House cafe for one month now.

P : One month ?

J : Yeah, one month.

P : Then can you tell us how you did find the cafe before coming to Japan ?

J : Eventually it was a friend of mine Jessica, she’s another Australian, she came a couple of months ago with her friends and recommended it to me, saying that it has… a really good vibe to it, and a good place to get friendly with foreigners and the locals to get together and… to just hang out and chat. And that picked my interest, especially since I have difficulties to get close to the locals and I thought it twas a great way to set my foot into it.

P : And after everything, what do you think about the cafe ?

J : It was beyond what I expected honestly…

P : Oh yeah ?

J : Yeah. I was thinking about coming quite blind and didn’t do much of researches before coming to Japan, I just took for account my friend’s words and, after being here for a month, everyone and everything going on here is consistently being friendly, being a lot of fun and it has been very unique. Everyone I’ve met were happy when they left, and I think this is something very important as consistency, not just one person having a eat time, basically everyone having a great time is important as well.

P : So you met some good people here ? Made some friends along the way ?

J : Yeah, whether staff members or customers, really kind people and… Go above to make you feel like part of a family…

P : A family, really ?

J : Yeah !

P : So… then, in the first place, may I ask you why did you came to Japan ?

J : I always had an interest for japanese culture and, I’ve already been to Japan four times already and I’ve always felt really safe in that country… I love all the food, the customs, the sightseeings and… the main thing that has always attracted me here is the kind of opportunities that you can only have here, by that I mean types of cafe, restaurants, activities, themed parks and everything like that, I feel like it is something you won’t see anywhere else. And that’s why I keep coming back here.

P : I can see that. Also I know that you are an author so, maybe you find some good inspiration here ?

J : Oh I have spent too much time doing anything else and enjoying myself rather than sitting down thinking about other realities… That being said I admit that I will take away all the experiences that I had here, and… maybe be able to use it in my future works yeah. Maybe something set in a japanese theme or japanese people but I don’t really know yet.  

P : Okay. So, during this trip, did you saw interesting things ? What did you visit ?

J : Oh yeah, I always try to do something different every time I come here, and especially during that trip I mean, I went a month prior and with my friend Jessica We travelled around Japan, going to amusement parks, climbing mountains in the snow and then I… Also went to Osaka and Kyoto which was… I mean I’ve done this before so there isn’t anything new but, with my friend we went to this virtual reality thing and…

P : Oh you went there ?

J : Yeah ! It was an activity in Shinjuku, it was surprisingly fun, something I think I’ve never seen before and I’ve been loving it. I recommend it to anybody coming here… Then in island near the Mount Fuji, that was fantastic !

P : Well then, maybe we will go there !

J : Yeah, do so !

P : I also know that you will not be leaving Japan just now, you will be receiving your family and friends, so are you planning to visit something in particular or will you just go around… ?

J : BAsically, everything I’ve been doing so far I’m redoing it, most of the people – I’ve got a couple of friends and my mother with a friend of her – so they’ve never really been in Japan before, and my boyfriend is coming too, he has been coming with me already and we have done all the tourist stuff… So they are leaving everything up to me, whatever I found really interesting during this trip I will be doing all over again with them so that is exactly what is going to happen. We will be doing all the Mario Kart thing, the robot cafe, the cat cafe, the snake cafe, the owl cafe, the fishing restaurant… The maid cafe, staying at a capsule hotel… doing everything and everything, going to Mount Fuji…

P : Okay…

J : And I will be having done it three times already!

P : At least you liked it!

J : Yeah, I got to really like it!

P : Then maybe a last question, do you have some advices for english speaking people who would like to come to Japan ?

J : Some advises… Basically before to come here you have to understand all the customs and rules here… Just some social minor behaviors like do not talk on your phone in the train, take off your shoes when you are entering someone’s house, little things that you may already know of… That will really be helpful to understand things when you come… otherwise it is very foreign friendly here, you will find – especially if you are an english speaking – everywhere translated signs, it has been all adapted to help tourists, so there’s really nothing much to worry about… ? Just come over and relax, and then enjoy yourself… they may be some things that they won’t tell you because of some… Social decency they have, but just understand them and know about what to do and not to do. Otherwise you will be fine.

P : I see. Well, this is the end for today. Thank you Jacinta, hope to see you again in the cafe!

J : Yes, thank you!

Mickey House apparently appealed to her as a place to mingle with the locals and also other national people. She found many information via Mickey House, and indeed smiled all along the interview.

Sometimes a smile is worth a thousand words.

So what about you? Let us know your experience of Japan if you have ever travelled in Japan or are actually living in Japan right now. We would love hearing from you!

Mickey House will always be there as a hub to welcome you and make sure you get the information you need or your stay to be a memorable one.

Until next time,

Cheers!

Mickey House

 

Le Japon, autre pays, autre façon de concevoir le rapport à l’argent

Pour toute personne qui met pour la première fois les pieds au Japon, il y a un système qui peut surprendre : les frais d’entrée dans les établissements tels que les restaurants. Souvent pratiqués dans les cafés et bars, ces quelques centaines de yens (quelques 5 à 7 euros) sont malheureusement monnaie courante dans le pays.

Cela s’appelle “o-toushi” (お通し), ce qui signifie littéralement “passage” et donc peut être interprété comme “monnaie de passage”, et non, cela n’a absolument rien à voir avec quelque arnaque à touriste que ce soit. Il ne s’agit pas non plus de cette pièce de monnaie que les morts devaient donner à Charon pour passer la rivière Styx : en effet, au Japon ce sont d’autres dieux qui sont présents!

Blague à part, et ce pour éviter que beaucoup d’entre-ceux qui se décident à faire l’expérience du Soleil levant, à court voire à long terme, voici quelques informations pratiques à ce sujet.

La “monnaie de passage” au Japon

Alors kesako de cette coutume de “monnaie de passage” ?

En France, et dans la plupart des autres pays européens d’ailleurs, nous sommes habitués à payer à l’entrée des boîtes de nuit ou autres bars dansant huppés à la tombée de la nuit, la première boisson étant en général offerte.

Au Japon, ce principe existe également, mais il s’applique à différents types d’établissements et à n’importe quelle heure de la journée. Cette “monnaie de passage” est tout simplement une “charge”. En Europe, le concept qui s’en rapproche le plus est le droit d’entrée.

Souvent, cette somme s’élèvera à 500 voire 700 yens, ce qui correspond à quelques euros. Bien entendu la première consommation est également offerte et, avantage, les bars et cafés en questions ont tendance à pratiquer des prix réduits une fois à l’intérieur.

Il faut plutôt entendre cette “charge” comme une signe de confiance de la part du client envers l’établissement. Par le simple fait que le client octroie à l’établissement sa confiance sous forme pécuniaire, ce dernier, en guise de remerciement pour la confiance que le client lui octroie, fera tout son possible pour que le séjour du client soit le meilleur possible. Cette coutume est à relier à la culture du “omotenashi” et à la culture de la “réciprocité” au Japon, qui constitueront le sujet d’autres articles sur ce blog.

Le “omotenashi” ou le Japon dans toute sa splendeur

De prime abord, on peut penser que peu de restaurants et bars demandent ces “charges” mais la vérité est plus subtile qu’elle en a l’air. Dans les Izakaya (bars où l’on peut manger et boire pour peu cher) on vous tendra souvent un petit bol d’amuse-bouche. En France ces quelques biscuits apéritif ont un simple rôle d’accueil mais sachez qu’au Japon cet “amuse-bouche” ou “mise en bouche” sera de 500 voire 700 yens.

Peut-on éviter cette monnaie de passage ?

Malheureusement non, pourrait-on dire si l’on s’inscrit dans un état d’esprit à l’européenne. Comme expliqué ci-haut, il s’agit d’une coutume bien ancrée dans la culture japonaise qui reflète la relation entretenue par le client et le gérant d’un établissement du type HoReCa. La seule manière de ne pas payer est de refuser poliment et de s’en aller.

En effet, vous trouverez après tout nombreux autres établissements qui ne pratique pas ce “o-toushi”, cette “monnaie de passage”, mais ce serait fermer les yeux sur tout un pan du folklore et autres lieux typiquement japonais. Dans la plupart des cas, ce sont effectivement les cafés et restaurant plus internationaux, comme le Hard-Rock Café, Starbucks, les “restaurants de familles” du style diners américains qui ne suivent pas la coutume du “o-toushi”.

Un “restaurant de famille” (un diner à l’américaine) – Source: matome.naver.jp

En outre, la quasi-totalité des cafés à thème (cafés à chats ou “‘Neko-kissa”, Maid-Café, voire même le fameux Square Enix Café…) et même les monuments touristiques et autres musées ont souvent des frais d’entrée.

Les maid cafés ou la touche japonaise au service en café – Source: akibamap.net

Aussi, il est utile de savoir que lorsque l’on visite tout lieu religieux au Japon, il de coutume de participer à l’entretien des bâtiments du temple ou du sanctuaire au travers de monnaie sonnante et trébuchante juste avant d’effectuer sa prière et alors que l’on paie son respect à la divinité du lieu. La distinction en temple et sanctuaire fera l’objet d’un autre article sur ce blog.

Qu’en est-il du Mickey House Cafe ?

Le café de conversation Mickey House, lui non plus, ne déroge pas à la règle de cette “monnaie de passage” ou “o-toushi”. Cependant nous pouvons affirmer que c’est l’un des endroits les moins chers d’accès de tout le quartier de Takadanobaba au sein de Shinjuku à Tokyo.

Le Mickey House, un établissement qui se transforme peu à peu en institution

L’entrée pour toute personne n’ayant pas la nationalité japonaise est de seulement 500 yens, ou alors gratuite pourvu que le client commande une boisson à 500 yens. À partir de là, le café et le thé est à volonté jusqu’à la pause en fin d’après-midi ou la fermeture du café en fin de soirée.

Plus encore, les vendredis soirs, Mickey house est l’un des établissements les moins chers de la ville pour la consommation de boissons, softs ou alcoolisées. Une fois les frais d’entrée payés, c’est toute boisson à volonté de 19h à 23h !

Le Mickey House, café convivial en journée et bar amical en soirée

Bref, une étape plus qu’intéressante pour sortir le soir à Tokyo et rencontrer des gens intéressants voire collecter plus d’informations sur la vie à Tokyo et au Japon en général, les clients de Mickey House venant des quatres coins du monde mais aussi des quatre coins du Japon ! Peut-être serez vous alors tenté de poursuivre la soirée au karaoké avec d’autres clients ? La nuit vous appartient !

Vous êtes maintenant préparé à cette pratique très spécifique du Japon qu’est le “o-toushi”. N’oubliez pas que le meilleur moyen de visiter le pays est encore de se balader en ville et vraiment tenter de se fondre dans sa culture pour en profiter un maximum.

Toute l’équipe du café international Mickey House vous souhaite un bon séjour et espère vous voir très vite.

Mickey House, au naturel!

Retrouvez-vous au café Mickey House !

Français ! Vous qui voyagez, pour le travail ou juste pour le plaisir, soyez les bienvenus au Conversation Café Mickey House ! Probablement l’endroit le plus francophone de tout Tokyo et Shinjuku.

Qu’est-ce qu’un café de conversation ?

Concept très peu répandu en France, les cafés de conversation sont pourtant commun au Japon. Se sont des cafés et bars où les employés viennent de nombreux pays différents. Les Japonais y vont pour apprendre ou se perfectionner dans des langues étrangères en discutant avec des étrangers, mais pas seulement. C’est aussi un endroit où les touristes et expatriés peuvent retrouver, l’espace de quelques heures, des interlocuteurs de leur nationalité ou simplement rencontrer de nouvelles connaissances dans une ambiance décontractée.

Et le Café Mickey House ?

Le Café Mickey House est un établissement de plus de 35 ans qui s’adressait avant tout aux anglophones. Aujourd’hui c’est un lieu transformé par les quelques 16 langues et origines différentes qu’il abrite. Mais ce n’est pas tout !

Le jour, une pause café…

Prenez une tasse de thé ou café et trouvez une place libre à l’une de nos nombreuses tables. A partir de là, entamez la conversation ! Il n’y a pas de limite de temps pour parler la langue de votre choix. Les mardis, mercredis et vendredis sont spécialement dédiés au français. Mais n’ayez crainte, vous croiserez des français toute la semaine, quelle que soit l’heure ou le jour d’ouverture !

北欧パーティー

Le soir, un bar au cœur de Shinjuku !

Détendez vous après une longue journée de travail ou de visite. Il suffit de commander une seule boisson, alcool ou non, et vous êtes tout équipé pour une soirée entière à faire de nouvelles connaissances venant des quatre coins du monde ! Le vendredi soir en particulier, au cours de l’International Party, nous sommes l’un des endroits les moins chers de tout Shinjuku, et le monde ne cesse de remplir la salle !

Chilling in Mickey House over some cocktails or soft drinks

Et après ?

Le Conversation Café Mickey House se veut devenir cette éllipse dans la vie des expatriés, et un repère pour les nouveaux arrivants, touristes ou personnes voulant commencer une nouvelle vie sur le sol nippon. Nous souhaitons faire du Japon votre nouvelle maison, grâce à une connexion wi-fi gratuite, mais surtout au travers de conseils, astuces et informations tout au long de l’année.
Nous avons établi des partenariats avec des associations étrangères, telles que ASSIANA en France, qui aident ceux qui voyagent au Japon, étudiants ou professionnels, pour trouver un logement, obtenir un visa, etc… Et pour ceux cherchant à aller plus loin encore, nous nous proposons comme intermédiaire avec des universités et entreprises pour vous offrir des opportunités d’emplois temporaires et saisonniers.

Un café pratique… Mais peut-on vraiment s’y amuser ?

Avec tout ça, avez-vous vraiment besoin de poser cette question ?

Des français et visiteurs de toutes les origines viennent déjà naturellement nous voir pour passer des moments aussi instructifs qu’agréables. Si vous avez encore un doute, pensez à faire un tour sur les réseaux sociaux pour consulter notre liste d’évènements. Nous avons déjà organisé des soirées spéciales pour la Saint Patrick, le Carnaval belge, de la cuisine népalaise, un pic-nic sous les cerisiers en fleurs, etc…

Comment nous trouver ?

Si vous lisez encore cet article c’est que vous vous demandez sûrement comment nous trouver. Et bien la chance est de votre côté, parce-que c’est très simple !

Le Café est situé au 4ème étage du Yashiro Building.

L’affichage Mickey House extérieur

Prenez une des lignes de métro qui passent par la station T03 Takadanobaba. De là, empruntez la sortie 6 et faites 15m sur votre gauche, vous y êtes !

La sortie 6 de la station de métro Takadanobaba, ligne Tozai
Arrivée au Mickey house

Si vous n’avez pas trouvé la sortie 6, vous emprunterez sans doute la Sortie Waseda, l’entrée principale de la station Takadanobaba.

Affichage station de train Takadanobaba

De là tournez à droite et avancez tout droit sur 500m. Pensez à passez de l’autre côté de la rue.

Pour être sûr d’être sur la bonne voie, repérez l’enseigne de Karaoké bleue et rouge. Un peu plus loin vous passerez sous le panneau de la sortie de métro 6. Faites quelques pas après le petit cheval et c’est sur votre gauche !

Encore une fois le café est au 4ème étage, sur votre gauche en sortant de l’ascenseur.

Vous y êtes !

Toute l’équipe du English Conversation Café Mickey House vous attends à bras ouverts et espère vous voir très vite.

Mickey House Cafe: your true international helping hub in Tokyo

Welcome to the Mickey House, English Cafe !

Foreigners coming from and travelling all around the world : welcome to the English Conversation Cafe Mickey House ! Probably the best melting pot in the whole Shinjuku district in Tokyo.

Friendly English conversation table at Mickey House

What is the English Cafe Mickey House ?

This 35 year old cafe was first created as a friendly hub for Japanese  who wanted to improve their English skills and international people to gather and learn English by talking to each other.
Today, the cafe expanded to an amazing total of 16 languages to practice by talking to people from all walks of life in those languages.

What can I do in such a cafe ?

During the day, a cosy cafe!

Come on in and grab some coffee or tea and enjoy friendly English conversations. There are no time restrictions, customers move freely to any table an join all the different conversations.

スウェーデン語テーブルの様子
Cosy Mickey House cafe during day time

Even beginners of English are highly welcome!

People of all levels of English will feel at home here. You will find beginners tables and intermediate/usual conversation tables.

Most of the regular customers level up from a beginner level to an intermediate level just by coming to Mickey House! And we thank them for their supportive comments and feedbacks.

Beginners also welcome at Mickey House Cafe!

At night, a chilling bar/cafe!

Chill out after work or after your studies having either some soft drinks or alcoholic beverages and meet up with different people from all parts of the world and all walks of life. All it takes for foreigners is to buy a drink at the bar, take a seat, and enjoy!

Chilling in Mickey House over some cocktails or soft drinks

Anything else?

Mickey House is also a real hub for foreigners visiting Japan or moving in for a longer period of time, starting a new life in Japan. Mickey House is always there for you to feel more comfortable in Japan whether during a short journey, or a longer stay by sharing tips and tricks and useful information. We strive to make Japan your second home!

We secured partnerships with many associations helping foreigners getting student or working visas and a place to stay.
We put emphasis on providing a place where Japanese and international people get together in a relaxed environment and a great opportunity to learn how to mingle in the complex Japanese society. Everybody makes new friends here, and we constantly get positive and grateful comments and feedbacks from our customers!

Is it fun ?

Is this even a question?……… 😉

People from all walks of life, every country you can image of genuinely gather to Mickey House. Customers of all age ranges, come and have a good and fruitful time with us.
We throw each Friday night an English party and other unique events each month. Here are a some of the events organised by Mickey House cafe:

  • St Patrick’s Day
  • Nepalese Dinner Party
  • Belgian Carnival
  • Chinese gathering
  • Pic-Nic under the cherry trees in the park (Spring event)
  • Christmas & New Year party (games and bingo with nice prizes)
  • Etc. 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
Several different fun events with Mickey House!

Feel free to have a look at our past events:

Like Us on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/pg/takadanobaba/events/?ref=page_internal

Follow us on Instagram:

Instagram

Follow us on Twitter:

@cafemickey

Some of your friends might as well already know about Mickey House!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Mickey House Conversation Cafe

Opening Hours & Languages schedule:

http://mickeyhouse.jp/english/

You are already welcome!

話題作りについて!どうすれば・・・?

自己紹介の使い方によって実は落とし穴??!

実は英語に限ったことではないんですね。

想像してみましょう。僕もあなたも含めてこういうシチュエーションに陥ったことがないでしょうか?

自分:Hello!(こんにちは)

相手:Oh, hello!(あ、こんにちは)

自分:I’m Alexander. Nice to meet you!(アレキサンダーです。よろしくお願いします。)

相手:Nice to meet you, my name’s Mark!(よろしくお願いします。マークと言います。)

自分:So…how…how are you today?(今日、どんな感じですか?)

相手:Good, good…you?(いい感じです!あなたは?)

 

はっきり言って。。。

 

まずい!

 

笑笑

 

このままだと長く会話が続かない雰囲気が伝わってきましたか?場合によってあれで、終わってしまいます!せっかくの出会いなのに無駄にしてしまうのでは本当に勿体無いです。

でも実は日々ああいう風になってしまう人たちが多いんです。あなたももその一人かもしれません。

英語で話していて、途中で何を言えば良いか迷ったりしたことは誰にでもあることです!

 

話が弾まない時は質問がキーになります。

いわゆる質問力が高い人との話は著しく会話が楽しくなります。何より質問は準備ができるので、あらかじめいくつか質問を持っていれば良い!

じゃあ、いきなり「彼氏といつ別れましたか?」で行ってしまうので、変な方向に進んでしまったり、遠ざかれる可能性がますでしょう!そこで会話に役に立つ質問を取得しておきましょう〜

 

第一声的な最初の質問は?(初級編)

まず自己紹介を弾ませましょう!いわゆる「名前」と「元気か」以外のことをお互いに伝えていきましょう!

*年齢を聞くのはNGなんです!いきなり彼氏・彼女いるかい?と聞いてしまうのと同じです!そこだけは要注意。

Where are you from?(出身はどこですか?)

Where did you grow up?(どこで育ちましたか?)

Where do you live now?(今どこにお住まいですか?)

What do you do for a living ?(どんな仕事をしていますか?)

興味・好きなことについて聞きましょう!

最初の自己紹介と簡単な質問が終わった後は、相手との共通点探しに移りましょう。

相手は何に興味があるか知っておきましょう〜

What are you interested in?
(どのようなことに興味がありますか?)

What do you like doing?(何をするのが好きですか?)
*What is your hobby?は正しい英語ですが、ネーティブの人はあまり使わない言い方だと感じます。「ご趣味はなんですか?」とお見合いに出席しているような気分になる人もいるので少々注意!(笑)

What do you usually do after work?(仕事後、何をしていますか?)

How do you spend your free time / weekends?(フリーな時間・週末をどう使っていますか?)

食事・料理の好みについて聞きましょう!(中級)

坂本龍馬が大好きで、実は2010年の大河ドラマ「龍馬伝」を何回も観てしまったんですが、坂本龍馬は、実は、食事・料理の場で自分のトークのスキルを磨いていたと言われています。

確かに料理を囲んでいる時にこそ人と仲良くなりやすいからかなと感じています。

英語でも同じです。なので、相手の料理の好き嫌いなどを聞いてしまいましょう!

What sort of food do you like?(どんな料理が好きですか?)

Do you like Japanese food?(和食が好きですか?)

Do you have any allergy?(何かアレルギーあるんですか?)

Can you recommend any restaurant in Tokyo?(東京でどこかおすすめのレストランはありますか?)

 

相手の意見を聞きましょう

大概自分の意見を聞かれると嬉しくなるものです。ずっと日本で育てられて暮らしている方ならば、ピンと来ない方がいるかもしれないですが。

そうなんです!実は、自分の存在が認められた!と感じます。

Where do you think I should visit in Tokyo?(東京のどこを観光したらいいと思いますか?)

What do you think about this?(これ、どう思いますか?)

Do you agree to this?(同じ意見ですか?)

What do you want to do after we finished eating?(食べ終わったら何をしたいですか?)

最近のニュースや出来事についても忘れずに!!

 

前の「意見」の項目の引き続きニュースや出来事、人によって時事についても聞きましょう。

特に出身国の事情や日本いついてどう感じていることもとことん聞いてみましょう。

Have you ever heard about ABC?(ABCのことを聞いたことがありますか?)

Do you watch the news  regularly?(定期的にニュースを観ていますか?)

How is ABC like in your country?(出身国ではABCはどうですか?)

What do you think of ABC in Japan?(日本のABCはどう思いますか?)

最終奥義は?!

どうしても質問が思い浮かばなければ、

「あなたは?」と相手からされた質問を相手に今度聞くという手もあります。

いかがでしたでしょうか?

サガラ

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

今年より本格的にLINE@をはじめました、
定期的に英語のワンポイント情報をお伝えして行く感じです。

あら、面白いかもと感じた方はぜひ下記リンクでご登録くださいね〜

https://line.me/R/ti/p/%40zhg9242d

De l’aéroport de Narita à Takadanobaba

A propos des trains à Tokyo

Tokyo dispose principalement de 3 compagnies de chemin de fer, la ligne JR (Japan Rail) ainsi que deux métros (Tokyo métro et Toei, 13 lignes au total).

La ligne JR Yamanote line est la plus utilisée pour aller dans les grandes villes tel que Shinjuku, Shibuya, ou Ikebukuro. Si vous dites métro” à Tokyo, cela signifie seulement le métro de Tokyo. Pas les trains JR.

A propos de la station Takadanobaba

La station Takadanobaba relie la ligne JR Yamanote et la ligne de métro de Tozaie. Ces deux lignes sont connectées à la sortie de métro Waseda. Les autres sorties (comme par exemple la sortie JR Toyama ou la sortie de métro n°6, ou n 7) ne sont pas en mesure de permettre un transfert sur une autre ligne. Il existe aussi la ligne Seibu mais je suppose que la plupart des touristes ne l’utilise pas.

 

Takadanobaba station
English map of Takadanobaba station

 

[De Narita à Takadanobaba]

Vous pouvez utiliser le bus ou le train.

[TRAIN]

Si vous n’avez pas un passeport japonais, vous pourrez prendre un train nommé le “NEX” (JR Narita express) pour 1,500 yen. Mais ç’est seulement de Narita à Shinjuku. De Shinjuku à l’ aéroport de Narita cela coutera 3,190 yen.

(Si vous avez un passe valable (le Japan Rail Pass), alors le Narita Express est inclus dans le prix).

Aéroport de Narita (Narita express 90min) > la gare de Shinjuku (ligne JR Yamanote 5min) > Takadanobaba

[BUS]

Le moins cher est une navette nommée “Tokyo shuttle” 1190 yen.

L’aéroport de Narita (navette Tokyo  60min) > la gare de Tokyo (3min à pied) > station de Nihonbashi (ligne de métro Tozai 15min) > Takadanobaba

[Comptoir de ticket de bus Keisei, et arrêt de bus à l’aéroport de Narita]


Un bus passe toutes les 20 min.


Acheter un billet au comptoir de b
us Keisei. De Tokyo à Narita, acheter un billet directement dans le bus.

keisei1 keisei2

Voici le plan de la station d’arrêt de bus Tokyo”.

La sortie de la gare Nihonbashi est la A3 pour la ligne de métro Tozai. (Mais vous devrez utiliser les escaliers.)

Si vous ne voulez pas utiliser les escaliers, marchez jusqu’à Yaesu” sortie nord de la gare de Tokyo, puis prendre la ligne JR Yamanote. Takadanobaba est à environ 30 min direction Ueno et Ikebukuro.

tokyoshuttle

tokyoshuttle